****Bellevue University Earns CACREP Accreditation - click here to read

 

***MSCC program from University website - CLICK HERE

(Please see the links and resources on the curriculum page of the University website)

 

 

The next program will begin mid-January 2018.

The required onsite Brooklyn, NY seminar will be mid-January 2018.

  • Calendar coming soon

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MS in Clinical Counseling

University Accreditation

Bellevue University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission through the U.S. Department of Education.

Academic Program Accreditation

The Bellevue University Master of Science in Clinical Counseling is accredited by CACREP (Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs). CACREP accreditation provides recognition that the content and quality of the program has been evaluated and meets standards set by the profession (www.cacrep.org).

Degree Overview

The Bellevue University Master of Science in Clinical Counseling degree is modeled on national licensing standards and will prepare you to take the national licensing exam to become a mental health counselor. With a CACREP accredited program, you can be assured that appropriate knowledge and skill areas are included and that the program is stable, professionally and financially.

Through a practicum and internship, you will be able to apply your learning directly to the field under the guidance and supervision of a licensed professional, gaining confidence and practical experience to serve the mental health needs of children, adolescents, and adults over the life span.

The Bellevue University Master’s in Clinical Counseling is a licensure-track, 60 credit-hour online graduate degree program. The degree includes 100 hours of practicum (40% direct client contact) and 600 hours of clinical internship (40% direct client contact). Whether you choose to do your coursework online or in class, you are responsible to complete these practicum and clinical internship hours under the supervision of a licensed counseling professional. Please note that online students may complete clinical hours in their home state through an accountability and approval process with Bellevue University’s Clinical Coordinator.

Performance Outcomes

Your graduate degree coursework will prepare you with:

  • Foundation courses that introduce the counseling profession including theories, research practices, human development, and legal and ethical issues
  • Advanced courses for progressive understanding in areas such as diagnosis of disorders, group processes, social and cultural diversity, medical and social-psychosocial aspects of drug use, career development, couples and family counseling
  • Direct service experience in Counseling Practicum and Clinical Internship to develop confidence and practical understanding of counseling work

Candidates for this master’s degree program must have completed a prerequisite requirement of 6 credit hours in the behavioral sciences.

*Education requirements for licensure vary from state to state. It is your responsibility to evaluate whether the Master of Science in Clinical Counseling meets the licensure requirements particular to the state in which you plan to practice. It is the student’s responsibility to confirm with the Department of Human Services (or similar agency) in his/her respective state to guarantee necessary coursework meets the state’s current licensure requirements.


For additional information about the clinical counseling program please see:

http://www.bellevue.edu/degrees/master/clinical-counseling-ms/index

http://www.bellevue.edu/degrees/master/clinical-counseling-ms/pdfs/MSCCHandbook.pdf

 

For additional information about the clinical counseling practicum and internships please see:

http://www.bellevue.edu/degrees/master/clinical-counseling-ms/clinical-manual.aspx


 

Major Requirements: Masters in Clinical Counseling (60 credit hours)

  •   MCC 501 Helping Relationships and Orientation to the Counseling Profession (3 Credits)

    This course assists the student in obtaining and demonstrating proficiency in basic helping skills associated with the practice of professional counseling and helping relationships. In addition, the course will address the history, philosophy, and trends associated with the field of professional counseling. Personal characteristics influencing the helping process, as well as self-care strategies of the professional counselor are explored in this course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Master of Science in Clinical Counseling program or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 502 Introduction to Counseling Theories (3 Credits)

    This course surveys major conceptual and theoretical perspectives and practices commonly associated with the field of professional counseling. Students explore psychoanalytic, Adlerian, existential, person-centered, Gestalt, behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, reality, feminist, post-modern, and general family systems theories. This course addresses the historical and philosophical development of counseling theories, and how they impact current practice. Students are provided opportunities to reflect upon how to best match counseling theories based upon specific client issues, concerns, and characteristics for case conceptualization. Students identify how their own personal experiences, biases, and preferences impact theory selection, while developing their own personal style of counseling. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Master of Science in Clinical Counseling program or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 503 Statistics and Quantitative Research Methods (3 Credits)

    This course orients the student to statistical concepts and measurements including scales of measurements, distributions, central tendency, validity, and reliability. Quantitative research method design is addressed. Students explore the role of research as it relates to evidenced-based practice as professional counselors. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Master of Science in Clinical Counseling program or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director. For students enrolled in the Master of Arts in Human Services, the prerequisite is none. For students enrolled in the Master of Science in Human Service Administration, the prerequisite is none.

  •   MCC 504 Qualitative Research Methods and Program Evaluation (3 Credits)

    This course integrates and expands upon the content in MCC 503, while further expanding the discussion of research methods to include qualitative research, mixed-methods design, and program evaluation. Grounded theory research; single-case study design; phenomenological principles; and qualitative interviewing techniques, data collection, coding, and analysis are addressed. Students explore program evaluation concepts, including needs assessment, study design, outcome measures, and integration of data into program modification and improvement. Prerequisites: Completion of MCC 503 or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 520 Human Development Throughout the Lifespan (3 Credits)

    This course surveys theories, scholarship, and research on human development throughout the lifespan. Students examine biological, neurological, cognitive, emotional, and social-cultural factors influencing individual development within a multicultural framework. The reciprocal influences of crises; transitions; normal and abnormal development; psychopathology; and familial and community relationships are addressed. Particular attention on the application of these concepts to the work of professional counselors is explored. Prerequisite: MCC 501 or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 530 Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in the Practice of Counseling (3 Credits)

    This course addresses ethical, legal, and professional issues commonly associated with the practice of professional counseling consistent with Council on Accreditation for Counselor and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards and the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Code of Ethics. National, regional, state licensure, and credentialing issues are addressed. This course identifies the systematic processes of identifying, implementing, and resolving ethical dilemmas mindful of various stakeholder concerns, including acting in the best interests of the client. The course explores personal and professional value systems, standards of practice, and legal issues in terms of how they impact decision-making processes and professional behavior. Prerequisite: MCC 501 or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 540 Assessment (3 Credits)

    This course explores the history, development, and effective use of various types of assessment tools for evaluation and diagnosis purposes within a variety of professional counseling settings and applications. Students explore the ethical use and interpretation of standardized and non-standardized assessment tools including conducting behavioral observations, clinical interviewing, mental status examinations, symptom inventories, suicidal assessments, and personality assessments. Students further examine various factors influencing the use of assessment tools with multicultural and diverse populations. Prerequisites: MCC 501, MCC 502, MCC 504, and MCC 520

  •   MCC 550 Theories of Psychopathology (3 Credits)

    An examination of the evidence-based understanding of both normal and disordered mental states are conducted. The etiology, development, manifestation, and potential treatment of mental disorders in infants, children, adolescents, and adults are emphasized. Current theoretical and evidence-based models are explored including bio-medical, behavioral, cognitive, developmental, humanistic, interpersonal, psychoanalytic, and trait models. Prerequisite: MCC 540

  •   MCC 600 Diagnosis of Mental and Behavioral Disorders (3 Credits)

    The taxonomy and nosology of psychopathology are reviewed using the structure and guidelines of the current editions of both the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) Manual. This course examines the disorders of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Emphasis is placed upon differential diagnosis for the purposes of case formulation and treatment planning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 605 Counseling Practicum (3 Credits)

    This course assists the student in obtaining and demonstrating proficiency in basic helping skills associated with the practice of professional counseling and helping relationships. In addition, the course addresses the history, philosophy, and trends associated with the field of professional counseling. Personal characteristics influencing the helping process, as well as self-care strategies of the professional counselor are also explored in this course. Prerequisites: Completion of all Foundational Coursework in the Clinical Counseling program (24 hours), Permission of the Clinical Coordinator or designee, and proof of professional liability insurance.

  •   MCC 610 Group Processes and Facilitation (3 Credits)

    This course provides students with grounding in the principles of group dynamics, group facilitation styles and approaches, and theories and methods of group counseling essential for a professional counselor in a multicultural society. In a workshop environment, students develop the ability to assess how their own methods and the dynamics of group interaction facilitate cognitive, emotional and behavioral change. Students are provided with a minimum of ten hours of group experience, with at least one hour of group facilitation experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 638 Social and Cultural Diversity (3 Credits)

    This course explores how cultural factors, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, and disability status, shape, inform, and impact minority populations, marginalized populations, diverse groups, and dominant culture. Experiential methods of learning are emphasized, including the development of self-awareness in the counselor, along with an appreciation for the experiences of others from different backgrounds and experiences. Traditional counseling theories, as well as more recent approaches to counseling diverse groups, are analyzed for ethical and practical implications including their integration into assessment, diagnosis, and treatment issues. The counselor’s role in addressing advocacy and justice is explored including issues of power and privilege. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 642 Foundations of Addictions Counseling (3 Credits)

    This course provides counselors in training with an overview of the addictive process and the practice of addiction counseling. Students develop conceptual knowledge, practical skills, and self-awareness concerning the etiology of addiction and its impact across the life-span. Models of addiction and professional issues in Addiction Counseling such as co-occurring disorders, process addictions, and mental illnesses are addressed. Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of addictions with diversity and advocacy issues are also explored. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 645 Career Development (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to the theories of career development as well as the assessment tools and counselor practices associated with helping clients achieve congruence in their career development pattern. Students explore interrelationships between factors such as age, gender, family, life roles, and multicultural issues as they relate to career and educational planning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 650 Couples and Family Counseling (3 Credits)

    This course introduces students to a broad range of theoretical approaches and interventions in the field of couples and family counseling with an emphasis on the systemic and relational components commonly associated in working with couples and families. The impact of societal changes, trauma, and mental health disorders on the family system are studied. Theories and models of couple and family resilience as well as the promotion of wellness over the family life span are introduced. Knowledge of how to effectively counsel couples and families, including problem identification, treatment planning, intervention, family wellness education, and relapse prevention are emphasized. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

  •   MCC 670 Advanced Counseling Skills, Techniques, and Practices (3 Credits)

    This course builds upon foundational and advanced coursework reinforcing the applied aspect of counseling skills, techniques, and evidenced-based intervention. Topics include case conceptualization, assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, termination, and documentation. Students examine and discern how personal counselor characteristics, belief systems, bias, and attitudes influence the overall therapeutic process; and, students discuss effective strategies for monitoring and managing these issues. Students demonstrate the successful use of counseling skills and techniques appropriate for varying client issues, needs, and situations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

Advanced Elective Course (3 credit hours)

This course focuses on the Orthodox Jewish theoretical perspectives on mental health services. It includes the Jewish ethical and religious view of the community and its leadership in relation to mental health services. It serves to increase the awareness and understanding of the unique mental health issues and needs of the community. It studies the community’s prevalent mental health disorders and social ills. It discusses the community barriers toward the acceptance and accessibility of services. It highlights the essential role of the Orthodox Jewish counselor in prevention, assessment and treatment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses with an earned grade of C or higher or written permission of the Clinical Counseling Program Director.

Internship Courses (9 credit hours)

  •   MCC 691 Clinical Internship I (3 Credits)

    The Internship is an advanced clinical, experiential course designed to strengthen students’ skills and understanding of the practice of clinical mental health counseling through supervised practice. In this course, students complete 200 hours of supervised practice, forty-percent of the hours must be direct service with clients/patients/consumers. A minimum of 10 hours of leading or co-leading groupwork is required prior to Internship III. Additionally, students attend weekly class led by Program Faculty designed to deepen their learning and growth at the Internship site. Prerequisites: Successful completion of MCC 605, Permission of the Clinical Coordinator or designee, proof of professional liability insurance, and completion of Residency II.

  •   MCC 692 Clinical Internship II (3 Credits)

    The Internship is an advanced clinical, experiential course designed to strengthen students’ skills and understanding of the practice of clinical mental health counseling through supervised practice. In this course, students complete 200 hours of supervised practice, forty-percent of the hours must be direct service with clients/patients/consumers. A minimum of 10 hours of leading or co-leading groupwork is required prior to Internship III. Additionally, students attend weekly class led by Program Faculty designed to deepen their learning and growth at the Internship site. Prerequisites: Successful completion of MCC 691, Permission of the Clinical Coordinator or designee, and proof of professional liability insurance.

  •   MCC 693 Clinical Internship III (3 Credits)

    The Internship is an advanced clinical, experiential course designed to strengthen students’ skills and understanding of the practice of clinical mental health counseling through supervised practice. In this course, students complete 200 hours of supervised practice, forty-percent of the hours must be direct service with clients/patients/consumers. A minimum of 10 hours of leading or co-leading groupwork is required prior to Internship III. Additionally, students attend weekly class led by Program Faculty designed to deepen their learning and growth at the Internship site. Prerequisites: Successful completion of MCC692, Permission of the Clinical Coordinator or designee, and proof of professional liability insurance.

Students applying for professional license or certification should verify the University’s offerings meet the requirements with the professional organization.


For additional information about the clinical counseling practicum and internships please see:

http://www.bellevue.edu/degrees/master/clinical-counseling-ms/clinical-manual.aspx